Category: – Music


Jacqueline Mary du Pré (26 January 1945 – 19 October 1987) was a British cellist, acknowledged as one of the greatest players of the instrument. She is particularly associated with Elgar’s Cello Concerto in E Minor; her interpretation of that work has been described as “definitive” and “legendary.” Her career was cut short by multiple sclerosis, which forced her to cease performing at the age of 28, and led to her premature death. Following her death, her older sister Hilary du Pré and younger brother Piers wrote a book about their family life, A Genius in the Family. It was the basis for the film Hilary and Jackie (download via torrent). Both the book and the film aroused fierce controversy. (wikipedia)

You can read an article about J. du Pré, her personality and image created by the movie and the book – article: The Trouble with Jackie (BBC Music Magazine)

“All I could do was stare at the pages and caress them. … I hurried home, clutching the suites as if they were the crown jewels. … I read and reread them. I was thirteen at the time, but for the following eighty years the wonder of my discovery has continued to grow on me. Those suites opened up a whole new world. I began playing them with indescribable excitement. They became my most cherished music. I studied and worked at them every day for the next twelve years.” Pau Casals (1876 – 1973)

Download all six cello suites playd by Casals – torrent


You may also like Bach`s cello suites played by Peter Bruns – link




Dokonalé.

Grisha Goryachev
http://www.grishaguitar.com
http://www.myspace.com/grishagoryachev

Pure energy!

Egon Schiele with J.S.Bach, piano

Rothko with Liszt ‘Liebestraum’ piano

Caravaggio with Albeniz Asturias piano J. Federico Osorio

Eric Satie (1866 – 1925)


…on most mornings after he moved to Arcueil, Satie would return to Paris on foot, a distance of about ten kilometres, stopping frequently at his favourite cafés on route. Accoring to Templier, “he walked slowly, taking small steps, his umbrella held tight under his arm. When talking he would stop, bend one knee a little, adjust his pince-nez and place his fist on his lap. The he would take off once more with small deliberate steps.”

When he eventually reached Paris he visited friends, or arranged to meet them in other cafés by sending pneumatiques. Often the walking from place to place continued, focussing on Montmarte before the war, and subsequently on Montparnasse. From here, Satie would catch the last train back to Arcueil at about 1.00am, or, if he was still engaged in serious drinking, he would miss the train and begin the long walk home during the early hours of the morning. Then the daily round would begin again.

Roger Shattuck, in conversations with John Cage in 1982, put forward the interesting theory that “the source of Satie’s sense of musical beat–the possibility of variation within repetition, the effect of boredom on the organism–may be this endless walking back and forth across the same landscape day after day . . . the total observation of a very limited and narrow environment.” During his walks, Satie was also observed stopping to jot down ideas by the light of the street lamps he passed.(from /dailyroutines.typepad.com)

“Trois Gymnopédies” (this is probably not a furniture music)

Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (17 May 1866 – Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a “gymnopedist” in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a “phonometrician” (meaning “someone who measures sounds”) preferring this designation to that of a “musician”, after having been called “a clumsy but subtle technician” in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American top culture chronicle Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.(wikipedia)

“Gnossienne No.1 ” (this is probably not a furniture music either :P )

FURNITURE MUSIC
Satie himself used the term “furniture music” to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie’s body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage’s interpretation of them.(wikipedia)

“Furniture Music” (finally :)

Guitar version of Satie

Orchestra

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J.S. BACH – CELLO SUITES by P. BRUNS
(played on Ex-Pablo-Casals Tononi cello 1730)

– moje obľúbené :)

…whole playlist of suites no.1-6

Suite No. 1 G Major, Prélude-Allemande-Courante

The Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by Johann Sebastian Bach are some of the most performed and recognizable solo compositions ever written for cello. They were most likely composed during the period 1717–1723. The suites contain a great variety of technical devices, a wide emotional range, and some of Bach’s most compelling voice interactions and conversations. It is their intimacy, however, that has made the suites amongst Bach’s most popular works today.

The suites are in six movements each, and have the following structure and order of movements.

1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Galanteries – (Minuets for Suites 1 and 2, Bourrées for 3 and 4, Gavottes for 5 and 6)
6. Gigue

Scholars believe that Bach intended the works to be considered as a systematically conceived cycle, rather than an arbitrary series of pieces: Compared to Bach’s other suite collections, the cello suites are the most consistent in order of their movements. In addition, to achieve a symmetrical design and go beyond the traditional layout, Bach inserted intermezzo or galanterie movements in the form of pairs between the Sarabande and the Gigue. wikipedia

List:
Suite No. 1 in G major, BWV 1007
1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Menuette I / Menuette II
6. Gigue

Suite No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1008
1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Menuette I / Menuette II
6. Gigue

Suite No. 3 in C major, BWV 1009
1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Bourré I / Bourré II
6. Gigue

Suite No. 4 in E-flat major, BWV 1010
1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Bourré I / Bourré II
6. Gigue

Suite No. 5 in C minor, BWV 1011

1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Gavotte I / Gavotte II
6. Gigue

Suite No. 6 in D major, BWV 1012
1. Prelude
2. Allemande
3. Courante
4. Sarabande
5. Gavotte I / Gavotte II
6. Gigue

Bar Kokhba Sextet (John Zorn)

Bar Kokhba Sextet on grooveshark.com (celé albumy)

Bar Kokhba Sextet – Sother (from Lucifer – The Book of Angels, Vol. 10 2008)

John Williams plays Chaconne by Bach (1/2)

John Williams plays Chaconne by Bach (2/2)