Karigane (=kukicha z gyokura) s matchou. Vynikajúci japonský čaj obalovaný v práškovom čaji Matcha, výdatný a povzbudzujúci čaj od Marukyu Koyamaen.

Čajový dom – www.teatrade.sk



Kukicha (茎茶), or twig tea, also known as bōcha (棒茶), is a Japanese blend made of stems, stalks, and twigs. It is available as a green tea or in more oxidized processing. Kukicha has a unique flavor and aroma among teas, due to its being composed of parts of the tea plant that are excluded from most other teas.

Regular Kukicha material comes from production of Sencha or Matcha. When coming from Gyokuro’s production, it takes the name of Karigane (雁ヶ音 / かりがね) or Shiraore (白折 / しらおれ).

Kukicha has a mildly nutty, and slightly creamy sweet flavor. It is made of four sorts of stems, stalks and twigs of Camellia sinensis. For best results, kukicha is steeped in water between 70°C to 80°C (155°F – 180°F). Green varieties are best steeped for less than one minute (oversteeping or steeping too hot, as with all green teas, will result in a bitter, unsavoury brew).
It is common to steep kukicha for three or four infusions. Recommended steep durations: First infusion: 40 sec, 2nd: 15 sec, 3rd: 30 sec.



Matcha (抹茶?, pronounced [mat.tɕa][1]) refers to finely-milled Japanese green tea. The cultural activity called the Japanese tea ceremony centers on the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha. In modern times, matcha has also come to be used to flavour and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi (Japanese confectionery).

Blends of matcha are given poetic names called chamei (“tea names”) either by the producing plantation, shop or creator of the blend, or by the grand master of a particular tea tradition. When a blend is named by the grand master of some tea ceremony lineage, it becomes known as the master’s konomi, or favoured blend.



Karigane Usugasum (s Matchou)

Reklamy